Events in Rome

In Conversation with an Enjoy Rome Tour Guide

Allow us to introduce you to (insert name) who has been working as an Enjoy Rome Tour Guide for a number of years. As an award-winning Tour Agency, we strive to always deliver a superior service, ensuring that our visitors receive the best service and tours. As such, we work solely with licensed guides who have degrees and PhDs in Archaeology and the History of Arts.

Our expert multi-lingual Tour Guides have exceptional knowledge of the Eternal City and other places in Italy where we operate tours (Venice, Florence, Tivoli, and Pompei. All tours are listed on www.enjoyrome.com). They love sharing their knowledge and insights with visitors. Every year thousands of guests join us for tours and learn about the history of the Vatican, Colosseum, Roman Forum, and many other historic places and monuments.

What is the best thing about being an Enjoy Rome Tour Guide?

“I enjoy meeting people from all over the world and sharing information about my wonderful city with them. No two groups are the same. Visitors come to Italy from all over the world. They have different interests and things they want to know about. The great thing about smaller group tours is being able to have conversations with our visitors as a group. Often one person’s question will spark an interest in that topic with someone else in the group.

I love seeing people’s reactions when they see something spectacular for the first time. Rome has so many breathtaking views, works of art, and ancient buildings, and particularly for those who are visiting for the first time, it is lovely to see their reactions. For me, it’s a pleasure to introduce people to the Eternal City.”

What are the benefits to visitors of a small group, private or semi-private tour of the Vatican or Colosseum?

“The major benefit is that our tours have local tour guides leading them. It’s not just a recording people are listening to, so our visitors have the chance to interact, ask questions and get more in-depth knowledge. They can also ask for recommendations of places to visit or restaurants where they can eat typical Roman cuisine.

Many of our tours are ‘skip the line’ so it’s quick to access places such as the Vatican and Colosseum. At certain times of the year these locations are extremely crowded so being able to skip the line means starting the tour without having to hang about in long queues. This is a massive benefit particularly when it’s hot.

With a local tour guide who has grown up in the city and knows the city inside out, visitors gain an insider’s perspective and often get a sneak peek at some hidden gems.”

If you were asked for the top 5 things to see and do in Rome, what would you recommend?

“With so many amazing things to see and do and places to visit, it’s hard to pick just 5. If someone is visiting for the first time, I would recommend visiting:

    1. The Vatican
    2. The Colosseum
    3. The Roman Forum
    4. The City Centre (covers well-known locations such as the Trevi Fountain, Spanish Steps, Piazza Navona, and the Pantheon, to name just a few)
    5. Trastevere

We look forward to welcoming you soon.”

To find out more about our tours of Rome, check out enjoyrome.com or take a look at our blog for some insights into some of the delights Rome offers.

Always A Warm Welcome at Enjoy Rome

We love welcoming visitors to Rome. We know what an incredible city we live in and always take great pleasure in offering all our guests a special experience. Exceptional customer service is at the heart of what we do. We aim to offer superior customer service from the moment someone visits our website or contacts us via social media, WhatsApp, phone, or in-person when entering our office.

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Because of the restrictions imposed by the pandemic, we have ensured our bright and airy office close to the Vatican is set up to welcome visitors again safely. We have installed perspex screens at the reception desk and put social distancing measures in place; we have hand sanitizer available and ensure all staff and visitors wear masks.

Location
The Enjoy Rome office is strategically located close to the Vatican City, just a five-minute walk to the Vatican Museums and a ten-minute walk to the Ottaviano Metro station. It is here that guests joining us for one of our Vatican Tours check in to meet their tour guides.

We know that there is a lot to see on our tours and there will be a lot of walking, which is why we chose this location for one of our offices. Many other tour companies meet their guests in front of the Vatican. We like to offer our visitors a place where they can relax before or after their tours. Our offices have a comfortable lounge and bathroom, plug sockets to recharge mobiles and electronic devices, refreshments, a vending machine, and an ATM cash machine.

Staff and Tour Guides
We are fortunate to work with licensed guides from the City Council of Rome. Our expert tour guides have degrees and PhDs in Archaeology and the History of Arts.

Our Enjoy Rome staff are available to help our visitors and will happily answer questions, provide maps and make recommendations for places to visit or restaurants and bars to eat at.

When you join an Enjoy Rome small group guided tour, you can always expect a very warm welcome and a memorable experience.

By |April 29th, 2021|Best places in Rome, Events in Rome, Holiday, Things to do in Rome|0 Comments

Explore Rome’s Magnificent Churches

With over nine hundred churches in the eternal city, there is so much history, art, and stunning architecture to explore. Pilgrims, tourists, and locals visit Rome’s churches to observe some of the most magnificent artworks, treasures, and architecture ever created.

World-renowned artists such as Michelangelo, Bernini, Caravaggio, and Raphael, to name just a few, have created magnificent masterpieces that are displayed in basilicas across the city. Filled with sculptures, paintings, frescoes, mosaics, and other types of art and religious artifacts, churches have become so much more than just a place of worship.

As well as the well-known, awe-inspiring churches such as the Saint Peter’s Basilica, there are also many smaller, less ornate historic churches in the capital hosting an abundance of artworks.

We are delighted to offer small group guided tours of some of these beautiful architectural masterpieces. All our tours respect the regulations imposed due to the Covid-19 pandemic. As a business, we ensure all our staff and visitors wear masks and maintain social distancing measures.

Our experienced tour guides have an incredible knowledge of the city and the churches. This month our tour guide Ilaria will lead small group tours exploring the Church of Santa Maria ai Monti on February 21st and the Church of Sant’Ignazio on February 28th. There are just a few spaces remaining on each tour, so if you would like to join us, contact us now.

Church of Santa Maria ai Monti on February 21st

This 16th and early 17th-century one-nave temple is a parish and titular church in the Monti neighborhood of Rome. Best known for the ‘Madonna and Child‘ fresco, the ceiling features paintings by Cristoforo Casolani of the Ascension of the Lord, saints, and angels. Architect Giacomo Della Porta created the design. Construction started in 1580, with this design being an example of the transition between Renaissance and Baroque architecture.

Church of Sant’Ignazio on February 28th

This Baroque church built by Cardinal Ludovisi between 1626 and 1650 was built in honor of St. Ignatius Loyola, founder of the Jesuit order. Inspired by the Church of Gesu, the design features a Latin cross plan with various side chapels. The nave ceiling is a ‘must-see’ with an incredible fresco by Andrea Pozzo that covers the nave.

Rome’s churches all have a story to tell. If you enjoy history and understanding more about art and architecture, you will enjoy one of our small group guided tours of some of the most beautiful churches in Rome. With just a few spaces left on these tours, contact us now to book your place.

For all our tours, including the Vatican tours and our walking tour of Rome focusing on the art of Caravaggio check out our website.

By |February 19th, 2021|Best places in Rome, Events in Rome, Holiday, Things to do in Rome|0 Comments

The Holy Year of Mercy and the Holy Doors of Rome

What is Jubilee/the Holy Year? 

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The practice of celebrating the Holy Year has ancient roots and can be traced back to the book of Leviticus in the Old Testament.  The year-long celebration normally occurs every 25 years and feature special events, pilgrimages, and sacraments centered around the forgiveness of God, but the Pope also has the ability to proclaim extraordinary Holy Year if he so chooses.  During each Jubilee, the Holy Doors are opened and those who pass through are said to be absolved of all previous sin.

The first Holy Year or Jubilee occurred in 1300 after many – who had been experienced war and immense suffering – flocked to the tombs of St. Peter and St. Paul. Since then, there have been  27 Holy Years including 3 that were extraordinary.  Extraordinary Jubilees (such as this year) are not previously planned and are called on by the Pope in order to emphasize a particular theme or event.  For example, the last extraordinary Jubilee was held in 1983 under Pope John Paul II to mark the 1950th anniversary of Jesus’ death.

What is the Holy Year of Mercy? 

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Pope Francis declared that December 8th 2015 – November 20th 2016 would be the 27th Holy Year and that it would focus on the concept of mercy.  According to interviews given by the Pope, this was done is response to “the world’s need for a revolution of tenderness”.  In other words, the Pope aimed to highlight the suffering, marginalization, and poverty that has permeated society in recent years and connect the suffering with those dedicated to providing support.  The Pope declared the official theme of the 2015 Jubilee would be “Merciful Like the Father”.

Why are the Holy Doors Significant? 

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Holy Doors are significant in the Catholic church as they are only opened during Jubilee years.  Each Holy Door is an entrance to a major Papal basilica and they are normally sealed from the inside using brick or cement. As previously mentioned, during Holy Years people are able to walk through these doors and receive what is said to be absolute forgiveness for their past sins.

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The most prominent Holy Door is located at St. Peter’s Basilica, however there are 3 other Holy Doors located in Papal basilicas in Rome – St. John Laternan’s, St. Mary Major’s, and St. Paul’s Outside the Walls.

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There are also many other doors that have been given this status all over the world.  Check out this interactive map to see where they are located. 

Jubilee 2016: The Holy Year of Mercy

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Pope Francis’ Holy Year of Mercy will officially come to an end this Sunday when the Holy Doors at St. Peter’s Basilica are closed and resealed.  The pontiff’s Jubilee of Mercy including a variety of events that aimed to highlight “works of mercy” such as feeding the hungry, visiting the sick, sheltering the homeless, etc.  It is estimated that over 20 million people made the pilgrimage to Rome over the course of the year to walk through the Holy Doors and St. Peter’s.

It is also estimated that over 1 billion people participated in the Year of Mercy worldwide.

Here are some of the highlights:

Pope Francis opens the holy door of the Bangui cathedral, Central African Republic, Sunday, Nov. 29, 2015. Pope Francis is in Africa for a six-day visit that is taking him to Kenya, Uganda and the Central African Republic. (Giuseppe Cacace/Pool photo via AP)

(cc: yahoo.com/news)

Pope Francis unofficially began this year’s Jubilee by opening the Holy Doors at a cathedral in the Central Republic of Africa

The Holy Year of Mercy officially commenced on the morning of December 8th, 2015 when the Pope opened the Holy Doors at St. Peter’s Basilica.

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Fiat Lux: Illuminating Our Common Home also took place on December 8th and featured images of our “shared natural world” being projected onto St. Peter’s.  The aim of the event was to inspire change regarding the current climate crisis across generations, cultures, languages, etc.

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The Holy Doors at St. John Lateran’s were opened on December 13th, 2015. The doors at St. Mary Major followed on the 1st of January, as well as the doors at St. Paul’s Outside the Walls on January 26th, 2017.

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Over the course of the Holy Year of Mercy, the Pope including various events dedicated to prisoners, the homeless, and disabled persons.  For example, closing events have including Pope Francis inviting prisoners and homeless persons into St. Peter’s Basilica for Holy Mass.


What was your favourite event of Jubilee 2016? Let us know in the comments! 

The Holy Doors may be closing tomorrow morning, however you can still experience St. Peter’s Basilica with Enjoy Rome.  Click here to book!

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By |November 19th, 2016|Best places in Rome, Events in Rome|0 Comments

November 19th – 24th in Rome

The month of November is flying by! Here are 5 things to add to your calendar this week:

1. Rome Jazz Festival 

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Rome’s 40th jazz festival continues this week through the 23rd of November.  Performances this week include Fabrizio Consoli, Paola Ronci, Jacky Terrason Trio, and many more.  Head over to the festival’s website for more details.

More information: romajazzfestival.it

2. Life of Wine

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On Sunday November 20th, Rome will be hosting an interesting wine tasting opportunity.  Organized by Florence’s Studio Umami, the event seeks to highlight the relationship between wine and time by featuring vintage selections.  The event includes over 60 wineries, guided tastings and panel discussions.

When: November 20th, 11:30-19:30

Where: Hotel Radisson Blu Roma, Via Filippo Turati 171

Entrance: 20€

3. Monti Unplugged: Emily Jane White 

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On November 21st, Emily Jane White will be performing as part of the Monti Unplugged acoustic concert series! The California native will be playing at Blackmarket in one of Rome’s coolest neighbourhoods.

When: November 21st, 21:00

Where: Blackmarket, Via Panisperna 101

Entrance: Free

4. Arnoldo Foa Exhibit

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Rome’s Teatro di Villa Torlonia is holding an interesting event dedicated to an Italian film icon.  Until December 30th, visitors have the chance to see a variety of photographs, film clips and personal items that showcase the life and career of Arnoldo Foa.  Foa is considered to be a staple in Italian film as he appeared in over 130 movies between 1938 and 2014.

When: Until December 30th

Where: Teatro di Villa Torlonia, Via Lazzaro Spallanzani 1A

Entrance: Free

5. International Festival of Sacred Music and Art 

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The International Festical of Sacred Music and Art will be in Rome until November 21st.  The festival features a variety of events that you don’t want to miss including performances by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra.

When: Until November 21st

More information: http://www.festivalmusicaeartesacra.net/en/programm.php


 

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National Unity and Armed Forces Day

Wonder why there were jets flying over the centre this morning? Or why Piazza Venezia was closed to traffic?

National Unity and Armed Forces Day

On November 4th, Italy celebrates National Unity and Armed Forces Day – which commemorates the end of World War I on the Italian Front and soldiers lost in battle.  The day is also meant to pay respect to those actively serving in Italy’s armed forces around the world.

On November 3rd 1918, Italian and Austrian-Hungarian forces agreed to and signed an armstice agreement at Villa Giusti in Padova, Italy.  On November 4th, 1918 the ceasefire between Italian and Austrian-Hungarian forces took effect – ending the First World War on the Italian Front and contributing to the conclusion of the war shortly there after.

The ceasefire was the result of the Battle of Vittorio Veneto in northern Italy where Italian forces defeated Austrian-Hungarian forces.  Some Italians see this victory as the cumination of the Risorgimento Nationalist Movement that unified the country in the 19th century.

National Unity and Armed Forces Day at Altare della Patria in Rome

Each year, Rome commemorates National Unity and Armed Forces Day with a ceremony at Altare della Patria. During the ceremony more than 1000 service members participate in the military parade.

The ceremony also features the President of Italy placing a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

There is a fly-over by the Italian Air Force’s aerial acrobatics team Frecce Tricolori.

By |November 4th, 2016|Events in Rome, Holiday|0 Comments

October 28th – November 3rd in Rome

It may be hallows-week, but there is still plenty of other things to see and do in Rome! Here are 5 interesting events to add to your calendar this week:

1. Van Gogh Alive: The Experience 

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This multimedia exhibition brings the works of Vincent Van Gogh to life! Using Sensory4 Technology, the exhibit uses 50 high definition projectors to display more than 3,000 graphics and pairs them with a powerful soundtrack – immersing visitors in Van Gogh’s most famous pieces from 1880-1890.  Experience a new depth to Van Gogh’s masterpieces and his unique style at this exhibit.

When: October 25th to December 31st / Monday to Thursday 10:00-20:00, Fridays and Saturdays 10:00-23:00, Sundays 10:00 to 21:00

Where: Palazzo degli Esami – Via Girolamo Induno, 4

Tickets: 12€-15€

2. Via Margutta Art Exhibit 

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This event is not your average art exhibit.  From October 28th to November 1st visitors and locals have the chance to explore the open-air art exhibit on Via Margutta.  More than 100 painters will be showcased and visitors have the opportunity to purchase the works they see. You may have heard of Via Margutta before; not only is it one of Rome’s most charming streets, but it is also one of the locations where Roman Holiday was filmed.  In the movie, Gregory Peck’s character lives in an apartment on Via Margutta, 51.  Experience a bit of Hollywood while also supporting local artisans!

When: October 28th to November 1st / 10:00 -21:00 daily 

Where: Via Margutta (Close to the Spanish Steps) 

Tickets: Free entry

3. All Saints Day 

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All Saints Day (Festa di Oggnisanti) is both a religious and national holiday in Italy celebrating the Saints of the Catholic Church. Its origins date back to Ancient times and it has been a public holiday since 1949. Important Information: Since Oggnisanti is a public holiday, schools and many businesses will be closed. These closures may be partial or the entire day depending on the business. The Vatican Musems will be closed and St. Peter’s Basilica will be operating on a Sunday schedule: 7:00-18:30 with masses every hours between 7 and 12, as well as an evening mass at 17:00. The Colosseum will be operating normally.

When: November 1st

4. Edward Hopper Exhibit 

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This exhibit features one of the most well-known American artists of the 20th century. Edward Hopper was a prominent realist painter whose paintings have provided interesting insights into American culture for the past century. Hopper was best known for his oil paintings, however he was also very talented with watercolours and print-making.  This exhibit features 60 of Hopper’s works – highlighting Hopper’s focus on the common features of American life as well as seascapes and rural landscapes. Featured works include Le Bistro or The Wine Shop (1909), New York Interior (19211), and South Carolina Morning (1955).

When: Through February 12th / Monday to Thursday 9:30-19:30, Fridays and Saturdays 9:30 to 22:00, and Sundays 9:30 to 20:30

Where: Complesso del Vittoriano, Via di San Pietro in Carcere

Tickets: 12€-14€

5. The Cure in Concert 

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British rock/punk group the Cure will be playing a live concert at the Palalottomatica Sports Arena on October 30th.  At this point it appears that most tickets are sold out, but you never know!

When: October 30th

Where: Palalottomatica Sports Arena – Piazzale Pier Luigi Nervi, 1

Tickets: Prices vary

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October 21st-28th in Rome

October is quickly coming to a close and November is just around the corner. Here are 5 must see events to add to your calendar this week:

1. International Photography Festival of Rome 

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This year marks the 15th edition of the International Photography Festival of Rome. Entitled “Roma, il Mondo”, the exhibit aims to highlight the juxtaposition of international culture in Rome through photography. The exhibit features works by both emerging and established Italian photographers, as well as international entries.

When: October 21st – January 8th, Tuesday to Sunday 10:30-19:30

Where: Museum of Contemporary Art – Via Nizza 138

Tickets: 9€ – 11€

2. Exhibit: Valeriano Ciai 1928-2013

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(@romeartweek)

This exhibit features 30 works by the famous Roman painter Valeriano Ciai – tracing the development of his life, artistic career and the city of Rome itself. Hosted by the Museum of Rome in Trastevere, this exhibit provides an interesting exploration of Italian realism and abstract art from 1928 to 2013.

When: Until November 6th – Tuesday to Sunday 10:00-20:00

Where: Museo di Roma

Tickets: 5€-6€

3. Giornata del Teatro 

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October 22nd was declared the national Day of Theatre in hopes of providing the public with the opportunity to re-explore theatric world.  As part of this declararion, all of Italy’s theatres will be open to the public on Saturday for tours as well as live performances.

When: Saturday October 22nd – times vary

Where: Please note that the specific location depends on which theatre you would like to visit.  Check out our blog post dedicated to Giornata del Teatro  5 theatres to see in Rome for more information!

Tickets: Free

4. Notte Bianca at Villa Medici

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Villa Medici will be celebrating Notte Bianca – or the White Night – on October 27th.  The nocturnal celebration will feature art installations throughout the Villa as well as the gardens!

When: October 27th at 19:00 – October 28th at 4:00

Where: Villa Medici – Viale della Trinita dei Monti

Tickets: Free

5. Rome’s Film Festival Continues

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As we discussed in our previous post, Rome’s 11th annual film festival continues until October 23rd! The festival includes over 40 official film selections including Florence Foster Jenkins starring Meryl Streep, as well as Oliver Stone’s highly anticipated film Snowden. In addition to film screenings the festival will also include art/film exhibitions, debates and panel discussions. Events will be held at the Parco Della Musica Auditorium, Maxxi Museum, and more.

When: Until October 23rd

Where: Event locations may vary; please visit romacinemafest.it for more details

Tickets: Tickets vary depending on the event; please visit romacinemafest.it for more details

October 21st-28th in Rome

The theatre holds an important place in  Italy’s culture and history. This has led to the Italian Minister of Culture declaring October 22nd Giornata del Teatro (Day of Theatre) in Italy.  On this day, the public has the opportunity to re-discover the value of the theatre by way of free access, tours and performances at Italy’s major theatres/opera houses.  Here is a list of 5 historical theatres/opera houses in Rome to explore on Giornata del Teatro:

1. Teatro Argentina

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Located at Largo di Torre Argentina,  this 18th century opera house is one of the oldest in the city.  The theatre was designed by Italian architect Girolamo Theodoli after being commissioned by the Sforza Cesarini family.  Teatro Argentina officially opened in 1732 and has since been regarded as an architectual jewel ever since. In addition to its beauty, the opera house has also cultivated a great deal of historic importance over the years.  For example, a variety of notable premieres have taken place here including Rossini’s Barber of Seville in 1816.  The location of the theatre itself is also incredibly interesting as it is the same square where the Curia of Pompey stood in ancient times – also known as the site where Julius Cesar was assasinated during the Ides of March in 44 BC.

Where: Largo di Torre Argentina, 52

2. Teatro dell’Opera di Roma

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Teatro dell’Opera di Roma was originally opened in 1880 with a seating capacity of over 2,200.  Famous for it’s lavish decor/design, the opera house was commissioned by Domenico Costanzi and designed by Milanese architect Achille Sfondrini. The theatre has held a prominent position in Rome’s cultural circles as it was the host of 46 premiere performances from 1880 to 1926. Although renovations have limited its orginal seating to about 1,600, the theatre is still regarded as a cornerstone of opera culture in Rome as performances continue today.

Where: Piazza Beniamino Gigli, 1

3. Teatro Quirino 

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Teatro Quirino was built in 1871 and is located in the heart of the historic centre. It was commissioned by Prince Maffeo Sciarra who was inspired to name it after Rome’s origins – Quirinale Hill (one of the seven hills of Rome) and the mythological god Quirinus. The theatre has been tranformed over the years by various renovations, however it remains a hub for theatric arts in Rome today.

Where: Via Delle Vergini,7

4. Teatro Sistina 

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Teatro Sistina was officially inaugurated in 1949 as a cinema-theatre and was designed by Italian architect Marcello Piacentini. Although Sistina is much younger than the other theatres/opera houses on this list, it has become one of the most important theatres in Italy.  The theatre was made famous by the works of Italian playwrights Garinei and Giovannini.  It has also hosted many prominent artists, comedians and musicals over the years.

Where: Via Sistina, 129

5. Teatro Valle 

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Teatro Valle was built by Italian architect Tommaso Morelli in 1726 after the Capranica family commissioned it for private use. Although the theatre has been renovated many times since its opening, it was originally designed as a classical Italian theatre – a wooden horseshoe shaped structure with 5 tiers of viewing boxes and a gallery.  Teatro Valle has been home to many notable premieres over the centuries such as works by Italian composer Gioachino Rossini.  The theatre has also become an important symbol of artistic independence in Rome since it was occupied by a group of protestors in 2011 who were arguing against the theatre’s possible privatization.

Where: Via del Teatro Valle, 21

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By |October 15th, 2016|Best places in Rome, Concerts in Rome, Events in Rome, Holiday|0 Comments

October 13th-20th in Rome

Fall is here and so are a variety of new things to see and do in the Eternal City! Here are 5 things to add to your calendar this week:

1. Outdoor Festival 2016 

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This October marks the 7th annual Outdoor Festival in Rome. This unique, month-long event seeks to give new life to the city’s neglected urban spaces by transforming them and putting them to use. This year’s festival takes place at the former military barracks referred to as Ex-Caserma. Throughout the festival there are a variety of artistic and cultural events scheduled including dedicated Saturdays to each participating country and film screenings on Sundays.

Where: Ex-Caserma di Via Guido Reni, 7

When: Until October 31st; please see website for specific event times www.out-door.it

Tickets: 8€ entry fee

2. Rome Film Festival 

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Rome’s 11th annual film festival begins on October 13th! The festival includes over 40 official film selections including Florence Foster Jenkins starring Meryl Streep, as well as Oliver Stone’s highly anticipated film Snowden. In addition to film screenings the festival will also include art/film exhibitions, debates and panel discussions. Events will be held at the Parco Della Musica Auditorium, Maxxi Museum, and more.

When: October 13th-23rd

Where: Event locations may vary; please visit romacinemafest.it for more details

Tickets: Tickets vary depending on the event; please visit romacinemafest.it for more details

3. Exhibit: Love 

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This collection of contemporary art explores how artists of the past century have expressed love in their works. Using a variety of different mediums, these works explore different themes in the context of love – passion, jealousy, etc. Artists include (but are not limited to) Francesco Vezzoli, Andy Warhol and Tom Wesselman.

When: Until February 19th; Mon-Fri 10am to 8pm / Sat-Sun 10am to 9pm

Where: Chiostro Del Bramante – Via Arco Della Pace, 5

Tickets: 11€ – 13€

4. Exhibit: La Spina Del Borgo 

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This exhibit gives you the chance to explore Rome’s changing urban landscape. Hosted by the Capitoline Museums, this exhibit focuses on La Spina del Borgo – a renaissance era block that once stood near St. Peter’s. This block was demolished under Mussolini’s regime in the 1930s to make room for today’s famous Via Della Conciliazione.

When: Until November 20th; open daily 9:30am to 7:30pm

Where: Museii Capitolini – Piazza Del Campidoglio, 1

Tickets: 11€-15€

5. Exhibit: Roma Anni Trenta 

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This ecclectic assortment of artistic works explores multiples themes/ viewpoints with the aim of showing the significance of art in Italian culture.  From the Roman School to the Fascist Era, this exhibit is made up of a vast selection of works including sculptures, paintings, mosaics, historical documents, and photography.

When: Until October 30th; Tue-Sun 10:00am to 6:30pm

Where: Galleria d’Arte Moderna – Via Francesco Crispi, 24

Tickets: 6,50€ – 7,50€

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